Exciting first aid training for children up to 3 years

ASB Schleswig-Holstein and Dansk Folkehjælp have applied for and been granted an extension of our SAVING LIFE project. This grant enables, among other things, the fulfillment of a long-term wish, namely the development of teaching material for children up to 3 years of age.

Project SAVING LIFE
The original project SAVING LIFE started per. June 1, 2017 and was to end per. 31 May 2020. The project focused on three areas within prevention and first aid:

1. Development of new technology for smartphones in Germany and affiliation of first aiders

2. First aid courses, including teaching optimization and exchange of experience between Danish and German first aid instructors.

3. Capacity increase of registered defibrillators

Both in Germany and in Denmark, the response time can be long and with SAVING LIFE, the two organizations want to optimize the emergency preparedness and the pre-hospital effort, so that there is an optimization of the time from alert to the first life-saving effort can begin.

According to a report from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry, 1 in 8 survives if first aid is provided by lay people, whereas only 1 in 30 survives if no first aid is provided. There are currently no corresponding statistics in Germany. At the same time, it is worth noting that as many as 76% of survivors return to work. If the survival rate can be increased, it will provide a great benefit both socially and socially for the individual injured person and their relatives. At the same time, at the start of the project, there was virtually no increase in the number of people with cardiac arrest using an AED. The figure had only moved from 1.4% in 2001 to 3.6% in 2014, but in 2019 the figure has risen to the use of defibrillators in 11% of cases.

In most cases, it takes over 5 minutes for the ambulance to reach the person with cardiac arrest. (In Germany, the statutory response time is a maximum of 12 minutes, but in fact it takes up to 30 minutes). Using an AED within the first 3 to 5 minutes can improve your chances of survival by 50 to 70%.

The problem is the same for both Denmark and Germany and the challenge is therefore to increase the capacity of the cross-border emergency preparedness.

Now also first aid for children
Both Dansk Folkehjælp and ASB want both professionals and children to learn first aid. Children in particular often suffer accidents and injuries, and here it can be important to intervene with quick first aid to avoid injuries and trauma to the children. According to the latest report from Statistics Denmark, there were 8,781 accidents among children in day care institutions in 2015. This is an average of 24 accidents per day. day all year round. In Denmark and Germany, we unfortunately also experience that accidents occur where children are suffocated in their food or in connection with play. Here it is crucial that the staff can quickly provide qualified first aid and thus help save lives, for the sake of the children, but also for the employee’s own. Standing with a child with cardiac arrest and being unable to provide first aid can cause psychological trauma to the employee afterwards.

It is also important that children at an early age learn first aid. They are far more curious, without inhibitions and full of courage. If they get first aid from the age of 3 through play and learning, and this is followed up through their upbringing, then it will be completely natural for them to step in if they come across people who need their help.

With first aid for the little ones, it is not only about first aid, but also about caring for each other. Through the project SAVING LIFE, teaching material is now being developed so that teachers, educators, pedagogue assistants, other staff or parents can teach the children themselves. With the help of the specially developed teaching material for this target group, the children are ensured a learning process that is both fun, challenging and exciting. The material is targeted at children from 3 – 6 years, who go to kindergartens and day care institutions.

The material consists of 14 posters with accompanying hand cards. All the posters illustrate a situation where a child has been injured or is on his way to it and the hand cards provide guidance on how the teacher can talk to the children about the situation. What happens, how can they help, how can the situation be avoided. In all the material, a mascot is the recurring figure. The mascot is not named by us, as this task lies with the individual group of children, so that the teaching can begin with.

In addition to posters, all children will receive a small exercise booklet with all the posters in which they can color as well as various first aid-related assignments, just as they will also receive a diploma that they can take home to their parents. The day care institution will be given a guide and posters so that they can teach the children themselves.

When the material is completed, the Danish People’s Aid will offer 80 free courses to employees at day care institutions, kindergartens, etc. as well as 160 free courses for children in Region Zealand and the Region of Southern Denmark, which is the area covered by our EU project. In Germany, similar free courses are offered for employees and children.

Children in particular often suffer accidents and injuries, and here it can be important to intervene with quick first aid to avoid injuries and trauma to the children. According to the latest report from Statistics Denmark, there were 8,781 accidents among children in day care institutions in 2015. This is an average of 24 accidents per day. day all year round. In Denmark and Germany, we unfortunately also experience that accidents occur where children are suffocated in their food or in connection with play. Here it is crucial that the staff can quickly provide qualified first aid and thus help save lives, for the sake of the children, but also for the employee’s own. Standing with a child with cardiac arrest and being unable to provide first aid can cause psychological trauma to the employee afterwards.

SAVING LIFE is funded by Interreg Deutschland-Danmark with funds from the European Regional Development Fund. Read more about Interreg Deutschland-Denmark at www.interreg5a.eu.